A Generation of Women Sloanies

This past June I attended my 30th Sloan Reunion where I sat next to Deborah Meyer at a women’s networking event.  Deborah mentioned to me that her daughter Lillian is a current LGO student. As far as I know, there is only one other mother/daughter pair who have matriculated in our MBA program.  I found their story fascinating and want to share their journey:

Deborah Meyer SM '79, and Lillian Meyer, LGO '16
Deborah Meyer SM ’79, and Lillian Meyer, LGO ’16

Deborah Meyer graduated from Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service in 1976 and worked in economic consulting for a year.  In the spring of 1977 she made the decision to go to MIT Sloan instead of entering the Foreign Service. After graduating with an SM in Management in 1979, she worked at General Motors in Michigan on the manufacturing side and later transferred to New York City to work with their pension fund unit.  Today she is Executive Director, Investment Strategy and Fixed Income at GMIMCo.  Deborah credits her MIT Sloan education in helping advance her career:

The MIT Sloan degree is well regarded.  I feel that my classes in finance were well in advance of financial practice.  Robert Merton taught introductory financial theory; Stewart Myers taught corporate finance.  Above all, my MIT training has helped me think in analytical and quantitative terms.

Deborah’s daughter Lillian graduated from Rice University in 2012 with a B.S. in Civil Engineering and worked for two years as a geotechnical engineer. When she started considering graduate schools, Deborah encouraged her to apply to MIT Sloan for the close-knit community and a first rate education which would mesh well with her background. When she heard about MIT Sloan’s LGO Program that combines a Master’s in Engineering with an MBA, she thought it was a perfect fit: “Together the degrees would provide more career opportunities than each degree individually.”

Lillian visited MIT Sloan for LGO interview fest and the existing students impressed her as “smart, genuine, and funny”. She reports:

When I visited MIT Sloan as a prospective student, students and faculty always commented on the collaborative spirit. The way I have experienced the collaborative spirit has surprised me.   It’s not just students working together to solve a problem set, but building and feeding off of each other’s ideas.  This energy has definitely led to some interesting discussions, and I’m sure it will lead to fascinating business ventures.

Learn more about the LGO Program.